On Anger and Hatred – From Swami Dharmamegha Aranya’s sermon

Let us discuss what Acharya Swamiji has said about anger and hatred. Anger and hatred are the biggest causes of disturbance in our mind. Anger makes us lose our balance and fall from our ideals, hence anger and hatred are a part of avidya or nescience. Nescience is discussed at length in Indian philosophy. It is the antonym of true or spiritual knowledge.

What happens when one is angry or jealous? Why is hatred referred to as nescience? In this context Acharya Swamiji’s statement is infallible: “Although hatred and jealousy cause suffering, people consider them favourable, acceptable and desirable” (Bhasvati 2/5). Continue reading “On Anger and Hatred – From Swami Dharmamegha Aranya’s sermon”

Purifying our mind – From Swami Dharmamegha Aranya’s sermon

आहारशुद्धौ सत्त्वशुद्धिः सत्त्वशुद्धौ ध्रुवा स्मृतिः
स्मृतिलम्भे सर्वग्रन्थीनां विप्रमोक्षस्तस्मै ॥ ७.२६.२॥

The mind remains pure if what it receives is also pure. If the mind is pure the recollection of the Self becomes steady. If the recollection becomes steady, one is released from all the ties of the world. (7/26/2) Chandogya Updanishad.

Everyday we chant the aforementioned prayer. Our two most ancient Updanishads are Vrihadaranyaka and Chandogya. This quotation has been taken from Chandogya. The first line of the quotation  is “The mind remains pure if what it receives is also pure.” (7/26/2). Again, if the mind is purified then it can concentrate on the desired goal. Here the word ahara does not mean food which we take in with the mouth but it includes whatever stimuli we receive through our sense organs. What we see with the eyes and what we hear with the ears are all a part of it. Continue reading “Purifying our mind – From Swami Dharmamegha Aranya’s sermon”